Sunday, May 15, 2016

Irn Bru

Irn Bru is a soft drink that was created in 1901 by the Scottish company AG Barr (usually known as Barr's). Originally named "Iron Brew", a 1946 law on brands forced the company to modify the name as it was not actually brewed. The actual change only took place in 1947 due to a World War II hiatus from 1942 to 1947. It is often nicknamed "Scotland's other national drink" (after whisky) thanks to its longevity and huge and memorable advertising campaigns throughout its existence.

AG Barr, a Scottish soft drink manufacturer established in Falkirk, began to produce "Iron Brew" in 1901. During the Second World War, Iron Brew was no longer produced due to a lack of raw materials. This lack led to the creation of a list of companies still authorized to produce drinks, and AG Barr did not make it.When production started again in 1947, a new law forced Iron Brew to change its name because it was not literally brewed. The company chose the name "Irn Bru", which allowed them to keep the same pronunciation. In 1954, Irn Bru began to be sold in England and for the first time it was subject to exportation. In 1979, the first plastic bottle was produced. Before this date, the bottles were made of glass and were returnable. Thanks to its success, the brand has launched a diet alternative of the drink as well as an ice cream. In 1997, AG Barr acquired a label for the tartan combining the blue and orange colours of Irn Bru.

Advertising campaigns started as early as 1905 in newspapers, featuring great Scottish athletes of the time. In the 1930's, a comic strip advert was launched, introducing the characters of Ba-Bru and Sandy. This comic was abandoned in the early 1970’s, making it one of the longest running advertising comics. The drink is well known for its advertising campaigns. One of Irn Bru's best known slogans is "Made in Scotland from girders", in reference to its rust colour. Some advertising campaigns have caused controversy and complaints, especially a television advert in which a woman claims to love Irn Bru like the rest of her family "even though she used to be a man" and is seen shaving. Current adverts focus on people having a bad —but nonetheless funny from the viewer's point of view— experience, claiming "Irn Bru gets you through".

Irn Bru's fame is quite substantial on Scottish soil, as Scotland is the only non-Middle-East country in which Coca-Cola is not leading the market of soft drinks. Irn Bru has always occupied the top spot. Furthermore, when a bunch of Scottish celebrities were invited to choose an item they wanted to be displayed in Scotland's National Museum, Sir Sean Connery went for an Irn Bru crate. The secret of the complete recipe is kept as secret as Coca-Cola's, with allegedly only three people who know it, contributing to its fame.

J├╝rgen Destexhe, William Dufour, and Corbeyran Harbonnier


SOURCES

-http://www.agbarr.co.uk/our-brands/irn-bru/
-http://www.agbarr.co.uk/about-us/our-history/timeline/
-https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JOGIQVlIduw
-http://www.theguardian.com/media/2004/jul/19/advertising
-https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irn-Bru
-https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A.G._Barr

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